Ethical amnesia

A new study shows that we tend to remember acting moral and forget our ethical misdeeds.[1] Obviously, this tendency limits our learning from mistakes, and deceives us into believing ourselves to be more ethical than we really are. So, don’t…

Are you ranked or stacked?

Some people are. I can remember working with Lockheed during an era when every supervisor or manager had to rank order all his/her subordinates according to their performance. This “stacking” was presumably used to distribute rewards and determine lay-off decisions….

A protege who needs to forgive

In mentoring, sometimes we learn that an injustice has been committed against our protégé that s/he find very difficult to accept. Sometimes, we can act directly or behind the scenes to right the wrong that has been done. However, we…

Machiavellians make horrible peers.

People with a Machiavellian personality use a duplicitous and manipulative interpersonal approach and focus on self-interest and personal gain. They rarely play office politics fairly, and in spite of their moral shortcomings, rise to leadership positions and enjoy considerable career…

Don’t use Facebook profiles in hiring decisions!

Increasingly, employers are using Facebook profiles in order to screen and select applicants for jobs. However, a new study calls this practice into question.[1] Specifically, a team of four researchers asked hiring managers to judge the Facebook pages of applicants…

Call it Karma

A new study shows that if you treat your followers with dignity and respect, you will experience enhanced well-being.[1] That’s right; good leaders are happy leaders. On the flip side, if you demonstrate narcissism with your followers, they will target…

Euphemisms dull people’s moral sensitivity

The use of euphemisms in the workplace appears to be on the increase. Perhaps due to hard economic times, the threat of nuisance litigation, or manipulative intent, people select less offensive terms for potentially objectionable acts.[1] Euphemisms are the use…

Mentoring a socially excluded employee

Mentors have a great deal of power over their protégés, and with this power accrues commensurate responsibility.[1] In few cases is this more evident than in the case of a protégé who is being excluded from his social group at…

Are you predisposed to awe?

In an earlier post, I reported research that shows that people predisposed to awe are prone to ethical decision-making, generosity, and prosocial values. This is because awe expands people’s notion of available time, which in turn increases their well-being and…

Over-claiming as a political problem

Employees often overestimate their relative contributions in teamwork. Individuals’ claims of responsibility for their group’s output routinely sum to more than 100%.[1] This bias can create significant problems for team leaders. Internally, team cohesion is threatened because individual team members…